1. Nominees

        1. VOID Planning (KR)

          Nexon Showroom, Seoul, South Korea 2006

          Concentrate & Collaborate

              Read what the jury said

          Visitors enter the showroom and offices of Nexon, a major Korean online-game company, through a passage that provides a clear visual introduction to the central theme of the project: reflection. Mirror-finished surfaces – walls, ceiling, floor – wrap staff and visitors in an inhabitable optical illusion. Following the path into the main area is tantamount to becoming a figure in a surrealist painting. Dominating the space, larger-than-life letters in vivid green spell out NEXON. Bursts of blue sky appear as pixel-shaped ceiling fixtures positioned at varying levels. Here, too, the reflective surfaces of selected walls and furnishings further disorientate spatial perception. The patterns and textures of both seating blocks and rectangular table exhibit a playful simplicity. VOID Planning has brought to life its own version of Nexon’s virtual-reality worlds.

        2. JKMM Architects (FI)

          Viikki Church, Helsinki, Finland 2005

          Serve & Facilitate

              Read what the jury said

          Inside and out, the Viikki Church is a marvel of precision carpentry. The project is the winning entry of a design competition that called for a modern successor to the long tradition of wooden churches in Finland. Conceived as a ‘total piece of art’, this church is dressed to the nines with tailor-made furniture and lighting, as well as custom candlesticks, vases, a glass font, coat hangers, trays for goblets and collection bowls. A variety of woods were selected and used to best advantage. Spruce whitewashed with lye lines the interior, including walls, ceilings and floor. Oak and aspen was chosen for the furniture. Splitand brushed-aspen surfaces give both altar and font a look of distinction. In line with the theme of nature, curtains and tablemats are woven from yarn made of paper. In this interior design, natural materials and excellent craftsmanship produce a wellbalanced mix of austerity and opulence.

        3. Studio Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe (NL)

          Exhibition Sur Place, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 2007

          Show & Sell

              Read what the jury said

          Sur Place, an exhibition designed by Studio Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe, provided visitors with an overwhelming sensory experience. When Fortis Bank, the client, relocated to new premises, the designers transformed many of the original building’s familiar office spaces into temporary art galleries. A veritable treasure trove, the Fortis art collection contains all sorts of objects, from antique to contemporary, including books, documents, paintings, furniture, sculpture and video productions. Items from this wide-ranging inventory were organized into 11 themes that lined a meandering path through the exhibition. A total of 38 rooms in the former Fortis building were open to the public – from monumental halls to modest chambers – and a wealth of exhibits put on display.

        4. item idem (JP)

          Bernhard Wilhelm flagship store, Shibuya (Tokyo), Japan 2006

          Show & Sell

          WINNER
              Read what the jury said

          The retail interior that item idem fashioned for the fashions of Bernhard Willhelm is rooted in the flamboyant German couturier’s postmodern potpourri of pop, colour and sex. Tucked into a department store in Shibuya, the 50-m2 boutique emerged from a brief that asked the designers to be ‘resourceful with rubbish’ and to make a flexible interior easy to reconfigure – a place that would strip visitors of their inhibitions. Makeshift dwellings housing the homeless of Japan – recyclable structures of cardboard and plastic – gave the designers their concept. Crammed with an array of items discarded by a booming consumer society, the boutique offers shoppers a trendy tour of a dense and decaying urban jungle designed to be transformed, six months later, into a wilderness with an entirely different look. A shop that doubles as an art installation – and that was knocked up for little more than €5000 – makes the distinction between ‘high’ and ‘low’ culture a matter of debate. It illustrates the pleasure offered by insignificant objects and the aesthetic inherent in recycled materials. This interior radiates the optimism found in the tarpaulin towns of those on the fringes of an upwardly mobile society and asks that we contemplate the presence of quirky teenage apparel displayed within a seriously seasoned shell. Do pricey clothes up the status of modest materials? Or do modest materials up the status of pricey clothes? Here in Shibuya an appreciative jury hears a jagged counterpoint to more melodic examples of retail design: virtually no other competition entry features the antiaesthetic that runs rampant at this flagship store. Bernhard Willhelm’s freaky fashions have been stunningly translated into a retail environment that feels like a collage, a junk puzzle that simply happened – without the benefit of design. Nothing could be further from the truth: to make this shop work – and it does work – item idem needed a crisp, precisely implemented design. The jury is aware that crudely assembled interiors thrown together overnight have enjoyed popularity in the form of so-called ‘guerrilla stores’ for some time now. It’s a thought that triggers two questions. Is this shop (and this award) simply a matter of the right work at the right time, and is it something that represents the beginning or the end of a trend?

        5. Maurice Mentjens Design (NL)

          Design Firm of the Year

              Read what the jury said

          This nomination is meant as an incentive to up-and-coming designer Maurice Mentjens. Original and packed with tongue-in-cheek humour, the work of this designer bears a distinctive signature. Since founding his studio in 1990, the year in which he graduated from the art academy in Maastricht, Mentjens has designed a wide range of objects – furniture, lighting, accessories – and spaces. Sirius, his most recognizable project to date, is a small chain of smart shops (with a product line of herbal remedies and energy drinks) for which Mentjens designed all interiors and branding. He prefers projects that demand a personal touch, usually creating and building his designs with no more than one assistant. His individual approach, along with a close attention to craftsmanship and technical details, is similar to that of an artist. His most recent project, inspired by an altarpiece by the brothers van Eyck, covers the walls of a meeting room for Dutch multinational DSM. Highlighting the work are enlarged microscopic images of substances found in DSM’s labs.

          www.mauricementjens.com

        6. Heatherwick Studio (GB)

          East Beach Cafe, Liitlehampton, UK 2007

          Relax & Consume

          WINNER
              Read what the jury said

          A stratified sculpture anchored to its seaside site in Littlehampton, England, Heatherwick Studio’s East Beach Café is exposed to wind, weather and the wiles of vandals. A project wedged between the water and a parade of houses presented its designers with a challenge: how to produce a slender, elongated building that would not be diminished by flat, two-dimensional façades. A gigantic club sandwich of irregular slices, hollowed out and vertically positioned, the café is enclosed in a protective shell that opens to the sea. The opening is filled with glass doors and windows that are protected at night by roller shutters concealed within the framework of the building. The pavilion, which was prefabricated off site, has a steel monocoque shell whose components, welded together, interact in much the same way as the parts that form the hull of a ship. Skin and skeleton are one and the same. Using a type of steel that rusts as it weathers, Heatherwick Studio created an integral structure that incorporates everything from bearing columns and eaves to ducts and airconditioning vents, all assembled on site. Thanks to the installation of low-emissive glazing and underfloor heating, the establishment, which seats 60, can remain open year-round. After taking one look at what one member calls ‘no ordinary seaside kiosk’, the jury is full of admiration for the strong image of a structure that resembles a shell washed ashore or a boat run aground and tipped on its side. Unlike Zaha Hadid’s pavilion, this is more of a container to which furnishings have been added than a sculpture whose form evolved along with its contents. The interior does reveal a sense of the building’s architecture, however. White spray-painted walls that follow the form of the rusting structure visible to those outside provide occupants with an understanding of how this Gesamtkunstwerk was built. Looking around, they experience ‘the inside of the outside’.

         
        1. Wonderwall (JP)

          Design Firm of the Year

          WINNER
              Read what the jury said

          Founded in 2000 by designer Masamichi Katayama, Wonderwall has built a wide range of retail and other commercial spaces in cities throughout Japan. While respecting the traditional aspects of architecture, Katayama believes in breaking boundaries. He was arguably the first designer to install a conveyor belt – think baggage claim – in a boutique. He embellished one shop with a merry-go-round and set a marching troupe of apes loose on customers in another retail interior. He’s put canned T-shirts in a refrigerator and mounted 34 plasma screens on a showroom ceiling. Although his themes are always decisively bold, they rely on excellent craftsmanship and elaborate finishes found almost exclusively in Japanese retail projects. Katayama’s work avoids both the theatrical pomposity and the careful framing that dictate the appearance of much of today’s retail architecture. His success lies in the creation of strong commercial environments that embrace rapidly changing contexts while providing each client with an abstract brand extension devoid of unwanted distractions. Wonderwall exhibits a high degree of professionalism without dishing up slick solutions. The jury is impressed by a firm that goes to such great extremes without losing sight of the need for nuance. The work appears to emerge from a free flow of thought and is perfectly executed. Not without humour, it is based on far more than humour. Exactingly detailed, it is not a collection of details. The firm possesses a signature style, yet every project is new and surprising. The jury recognizes that most of Wonderwall’s work benefits from relatively large budgets. On a more critical note, the jury wonders how much attention the team pays to the design of ceilings, which seem rather corporate in many of the firm’s interiors. That said, the work of Wonderwall displays a feel for materials, is never cursory, and verges on the decadent.

        2. Richard Hutten (NL)

          Public Garden Parkrand Building, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 2007

          Serve & Facilitate

              Read what the jury said

          Although Richard Hutten’s competition entry involves the design of a semi-public outdoor space belonging to an apartment complex, the designer clearly intended it to be perceived as an interior. The 220-unit Parkrand Building looks like an enormous block from which large, strategically positioned openings have been carved. Architect MVRDV and Richard Hutten interpreted the resulting 25-m-high exterior spaces as another ‘home’ for occupants of the complex. This outdoor dwelling consists of a kitchen-dining area, a living room and a children’s room, all furnished as interiors. The first has a wood floor, a fixed table, movable stools and oversized models of a simple ceiling lamp. Two huge chandeliers hang above furniture that stands on a rubber floor in the living room. In the kids’ room, tripod slides and little benches rise from a lawn of artificial grass. A herd of illuminated elephants completes this room, giving residents a cheerful view even when all children have been tucked in for the night.

        3. Neri & Hu Design and Research Office (CN)

          The Voyeuristic Wall (Y+ Yoga Center), Shanghai, China 2006

          Relax & Consume

              Read what the jury said

          Time and again, Neri & Hu Design and Research Office (NHDRO) displays an ability to plan a project down to the smallest detail and to implement its plan with equal proficiency. The serene Y+ Yoga and Wellness Center revolves around a handful of ideas faithfully carried through to completion. The 1200-m2 space comprises three yoga rooms, four massage rooms, a meditation room, communal facilities, a small café and a shop. Within the fast-paced, ever-changing landscape of Shanghai, this time capsule conjures up a sense of tranquillity by promoting both individual contemplation and group interaction. One room interprets the concept of a forest clearing with ropes dyed in shades of green, which hang vertically on one wall. Another room uses the absence of colour to minimize distraction. Strategically placed bronze-lined openings in the walls connect one space to another, offering students of yoga spots on which to focus and giving people in the corridors a glimpse of a world of silent concentration.

        4. Steve Lidbury (GB)

          Sunao Kuwahara Flagship Boutique, Tokyo, Japan 2006

          Show & Sell

              Read what the jury said

          Materiality is the central concept of this starkly designed Tokyo boutique. The coarse texture of timber once used for scaffolding – together with mortar mixed with powdered sumi, a substance traditionally used to make callig- raphy ink – forms a powerful contrast with sleek panels of transparent and mirrored glass, crystalline surfaces that divide the space into a series of smaller units without diminishing the coherency of the design as a whole. In this interior, glass and wood are classic elements whose simplicity merges with the allure of fashion in a boutique- worthy combo. ‘Everything is presented in such a way that it feels removed from the everyday,’ says Steve Lidbury, a designer who often explores contrasts in his work. A good example appears in the interplay of hard steel and concrete with diaphanous glass and polyurethane in his first Tokyo shop, Addition.

        5. DireTribe (AU)

          Dusk Bar, Melbourne, Australia 2007

          Relax & Consume

              Read what the jury said

          Dusk Bar transforms minimum resources into a maximum result. ‘Found objects’ glorified as elements of surprise and whimsy include cable-reel seating in various colours and sizes scattered throughout the space. In this setting, however, recycled goods radiate a trendy vibe rather than projecting a tree-hugging conscience. Lampshades made of compact discs add glitz and glamour. On floor and wall, a giant jigsaw puzzle rekindles childhood memories. Inspired by the film Faust, black-and-white tattoos sprawled on another surface provide a playful graffiti-like touch. This eye-opening mishmash of objects, colours and patterns boldly propelled Diretribe into the limelight. The trio of young Australians has served up a space ideal for unwinding after the 9-to-5 grind: take a seat on the nearest cable reel, strike up a conversation and raise a toast to the Aussie way of life. DireTribe Studio closed its doors in July 2007. Rodney Eggleston and Anne-Laure Cavigneaux have formed March Studio, and Campbell Drake is currently setting up a new office as well.

        6. Clive Wilkinson Architects (US)

          Commercial office for Maguire Partners, Santa Monica, USA 2006

          Show & Sell

              Read what the jury said

          The design of this office for property devel- opers Maguire Partners clearly catches the surf of sunny California’s beach culture. Waves and ripples echo in a variety of curved shapes, while light and dark panels of coloured glass enclos- ing conference rooms form highly textured surfaces reminiscent of breaking surf. The most striking feature of Clive Wilkinson Architects’ competition entry is the ceiling. CNC-milled mock-ups were employed on site to ensure accurate construction of the complex curving structure. More than just a pretty face, the multifaceted volume houses lighting, conceals mechanical systems, supplies visual continuity and exposes the shape of the building through the exterior glazing. Although ceilings are often ignored in workplace design, this one steals the show.

        7. Kossmann.DeJong (NL)

          Istanbul Exhibition, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 2006

          Show & Sell

              Read what the jury said

          Wandering the streets of Istanbul while Amsterdam awaits you just outside the door: Kosmann.De Jong satisfied this seemingly impossible brief with the design of an exhibition on Istanbul that appeared in Amsterdam’s venerable15th-century Nieuwe Kerk (New Church). On display were nearly 300 art treasures on loan from a great many Istanbul museums, including the world-famous Topkapi Palace. Among the exhibits were highlights of Ottoman art, such as portraits of sultans, kaftans, tapestries, jewellery, religious relics, marble turbans, hookahs and musical instruments. All these objects could be viewed by visitors strolling past ten venues designed and realized by Kosmann.De Jong, among which a bazaar, a coffee house, a hammam, a tekke, a mosque and a harem. Cinematic images, fragments of music and enormous pieces of bunting brought old Istanbul to life. With simple resources, the designers created a rich environment. They also deserve credit for taking on an enormous church and coming out on top.

         
        1. Neri & Hu Design and Research Office (CN)

          Design Firm of the Year

              Read what the jury said

          Neri & Hu Design and Research Office (NHDRO) lacks a signature style, which is exactly what makes the design-conscious among us sit up and take notice. Founded in 2003, this interdisciplinary architectural design practice operates at an international level: projects include architecture, interior design, master planning, and graphic and industrial design. Currently working on projects in seven countries, the firm’s 38-member staff communicates with its clients in over 20 languages. Diversity is at the core of the business. The practice works towards a ‘new paradigm in architecture by responding to a global worldview and overlapping various disciplines of design’. True to the company’s name, research is crucial to NHDRO’s design process, as each project addresses a specific site, function and history. Recent work includes a China House restaurant in Bangkok, a flagship for furnishings outlet Design Republic, the Y+ Yoga Center and, in Shanghai, the Muse club and Slice deli. Despite an everchanging focus and an impressive diversity of insights, the work exhibits a high level of professionalism: NHDRO’s projects are as clean as a whistle.

          www.neriandhu.com

        2. Ministry of Design (MOD) (SG)

          BBH Office, Singapore, Singapore 2007

          Concentrate & Collaborate

              Read what the jury said

          Contrast is key in a design that tucks an ultramodern interior into a prewar shell. Red-brick walls, solid-timber floors and exposed steel trusses have been reignited by the ‘conceptual creative flow’ of this plan for a Singaporean ad agency that spans two floors and a 1050-m2 double-height warehouse space. Ministry of Design’s open seating plan increases interaction and reduces the notion of a corporate hierarchy. ‘Dream rooms’ for concocting advertising campaigns float on two mezzanine lofts, putting the creative process on constant display. Freestanding pods scattered across the office floor play host to private discussions. A 40-m-long sculptural desk cuts through the space, providing a link between the entry, with its reception bar, and a library lounge located at the opposite end of the interior. The design provides a wealth of retreats for both private daydreams and communal brainstorming sessions.

        3. Zaha Hadid Architects (GB)

          Pavilion for the H. Lopez de Heredia Vina Todonia winery, Haro la Rioja, Spain 2006

          Relax & Consume

          WINNER
              Read what the jury said

          This pavilion for a wine producer is one of a series of recently built centres in Spain that welcome visitors to wineries and uncork bottles for tasting. The programme called for a prefabricated structure that would serve as a promotional display at the Alimentaria trade fair in Barcelona before being disassembled and installed at the winery. It was to shelter an old wooden kiosk – discovered in pieces, but now lovingly restored – that local joiners and cabinetmakers had made for the Brussels International Fair of 1910. As expressive of the Belle Époque as Hadid’s design is of the 21st century, the 4-m2 golden-brown kiosk with its rounded corners is an enchanting cubicle of carved and polished wood, plate glass and curvilinear typography. It may not be immediately clear to the observer, but the architects used the shape of the kiosk to discover the form of the new pavilion, which fulfils the same dual role as its predecessor: it’s both retail establishment and advertising aid. The designers morphed the rounded kiosk into an extrusion with sloping sides that support shelves and benches and added a tapered, glass-roofed lantern. In profile it resembles a traditional flask, which the architects insist was entirely fortuitous. The pavilion comprises 14 ribbed steel sections, each measuring 2 x 6 m and varied in profile, which were fabricated in Barcelona and assembled on site. Within the pavilion, which took four years to reconstruct and finish, the sloping walls and wedge-shaped shelves accommodate bottles and seating. A ‘signature Hadid building’ is the verdict of the jury, which calls the project ‘iconic’ while clearly stating that this is not just another decorated shed. The exterior dictates the form of the interior, which incorporates furniture and displays in a completely self-evident manner. Old and new fuse in an unexpected way inside the wine-tasting room, where the nearly 100-year-old kiosk dominates a space imbued with a contemporary computer-generated aesthetic.

        4. Klein Dytham architecture (KDa) (JP)

          TBWA / Hakuhodo Office, Tokyo, Japan 2007

          Concentrate & Collaborate

              Read what the jury said

          Bowling lanes and golf driving ranges continue to operate above and below the joint office space of international advertising giants TBWA and HAKUHODO, which occupies former bowling lanes in an eightstorey amusement complex in Tokyo. Remove the columns and bowling alleys turn out to be ideal accommodation for an open-plan office. Eliminating the suspended ceiling resulted in a double-height space with 2-m-deep down-stand beams. KDa added integrated lighting and air conditioning. The desk arrangement follows the rhythm of the former bowling lanes. A park, meeting rooms, project rooms and executive offices with raised areas intended as refreshing breakout spaces combine to form a small townscape. The 6th-floor entrance serves as a multipurpose reception area, gallery and meeting space open to visitors. A wide staircase leading to the main floor stops at a central café area where stepped seating and a large plasma screen invite both agencies to use this space for presentations. In perhaps the ultimate translation of an officelandscape project, KDa’s design creates a world of its own.

        5. J. Mayer H. Architects (DE)

          Moltke Refectory, Karlsruhe, germany 2006

          Serve & Facilitate

              Read what the jury said

          The design of Mensa Karlsruhe – a university refectory – unites interior and exterior in a seamless sculptural volume. Occupying a central site bordered by the three schools that share the Karlsruhe Campus, the refectory serves as a communal gathering place for students and professors alike. The dining hall was added to existing facilities in response to the growing number of students. Architect Mayer H. often explores hidden patterns and hightech materials in his work. Although this building appears to be made of some sort of high-tech plastic, however, the structure is constructed primarily of laminated timber sprayed with polyurethane. Referring to the design as a ‘Nutellagram’, Mayer H. compares it to the elastic mass that appears when two slices of bread spread with a sticky filling are pulled apart. A concept model for the project is part of the permanent collection of the MoMA in New York City

         
        1. Office dA (US)

          Fleet Library, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, USA 2006

          Serve & Facilitate

              Read what the jury said

          Complete metamorphosis or slight modification? Office dA opted for the latter in its design of Fleet Library, adding a series of ‘insertions’ that touch the historic shell – a grand banking hall – only here and there. The two largest insertions are a two-storey study pavilion and a single-storey circulation centre. These CNC-milled structures are part of the long tradition of material- and constructionrelated ingenuity for which Office dA is known. Assembled on site, piece by piece, the insertions provide a stark contrast to the existing building. The study pavilion accommodates a variety of workspaces for individuals and small groups, as well as a large stepped platform for seating. The nearby circulation zone includes a checkout area and two staff offices. Workstations and shelving are located at the edge of the circulation centre. Students can avoid the dreaded ‘Hush!’ by retreating to a centrally located living room where chatting is permitted.

        2. Concrete Architectural Associates (NL)

          The Clinic, Signapore, Singapore 2007

          Relax & Consume

              Read what the jury said

          A quick survey of Concrete’s body of work hints that not only are these designers enjoying what they do, but their clients are probably having fun as well. Founded in 1997, Concrete Architectural Associates has since grown to around 30 members and attracted a generous supply of high-profile projects around the world. The firm’s work demonstrates substantive interest in the nature of luxury as well as in the creation of solid identities for its clients. With an interdisciplinary team ranging from product and interior designers to architects and visual marketers, Concrete deliberately breaks with tradition to come up with the startling solutions that characterize each of its projects. Recent work includes Vyne, a café and ‘wine library’; Hyundai finance shops; Amaison catering outlets; Supperclub nightclubs; and The Clinic, a Singaporean nightspot that treats partying ‘patients’ with a wild pastiche of hospital-inspired glamour. Mendo, a bookshop whose interior features plain black books, was unveiled in Amsterdam in January 2007. More than mere over-the-top glitz, this team succeeds in making solid, well-considered, top-quality work.

        3. Concrete Architectural Associates (NL)

          Design Firm of the Year

              Read what the jury said

          A quick survey of Concrete’s body of work hints that not only are these designers enjoying what they do, but their clients are probably having fun as well. Founded in 1997, Concrete Architectural Associates has since grown to around 30 members and attracted a generous supply of high-profile projects around the world. The firm’s work demonstrates substantive interest in the nature of luxury as well as in the creation of solid identities for its clients. With an interdisciplinary team ranging from product and interior designers to architects and visual marketers, Concrete deliberately breaks with tradition to come up with the startling solutions that characterize each of its projects. Recent work includes Vyne, a café and ‘wine library’; Hyundai finance shops; Amaison catering outlets; Supperclub nightclubs; and The Clinic, a Singaporean nightspot that treats partying ‘patients’ with a wild pastiche of hospital-inspired glamour. Mendo, a bookshop whose interior features plain black books, was unveiled in Amsterdam in January 2007. More than mere over-the-top glitz, this team succeeds in making solid, well-considered, top-quality work.

          www.concreteamsterdam.nl

        4. Ryuji Nakamura Architects (JP)

          Jin’s Global Standard, Chiba, Japan 2007

          Show & Sell

          WINNER
              Read what the jury said

          Most retail units lining the corridors of a shopping mall reveal all at a single glance. That’s the first rule broken by Ryuji Nakamura Architects, the creator of Jin’s Global Standard, an eyewear outlet that occupies the 104-m2 corner unit of a mall in Nagareyama. Filling the interior are diagonally positioned rows of floor-to-ceiling walls that satisfy Ryuji Nakamura’s wish to furnish the client with an uncluttered interior and products displayed on 5-cm-deep shelves along a series of aisles. The only hint of colour in the otherwise white interior comes from wood-veneered shelving exhibiting a tawny hue that enhances reflections and shadows. Shoppers can see the sales counter through openings in the walls. Moulded panels along the bases of the walls conceal storage space. Cleverly positioned mirrors make the store feel more spacious and enable staff to keep an eye on customers. High walls on a shop floor are normally taboo for reasons of crime prevention and smooth store management, but Nakamura boldly ignores convention. Shoppers can easily step inside and try on a pair of glasses without having the prying eyes of staff distract them. The layout results in much more display space than would have been the case had Nakamura opted for a conventional floor plan. This simple yet strong retail concept makes an impact on the jury, as does the precise, sophisticated manner in which it has been executed. Large display windows beckon shoppers to enter nearly every retail unit in a mall, but architect Nakamura found another way to attract customers. Diagonally positioned elements star in his virtuoso performance: walls in a physical sense and mirrors in an optical sense. The performance is highly functional, however: it provides the shopper with privacy, while allowing the staff to monitor customers and merchandise. A shopping-mall unit boasting both a striking display system and an innovative spatial composition that influences shopping behaviour is a rarity, and Jin’s fits the description.

        5. E15 Design und Distributions (DE)

          Xue Xue institute, Private Design University, Taipei, Taiwan 2006

          Concentrate & Collaborate

              Read what the jury said

          In favour of an active alternative to traditional podium lectures, German firm E15 focused on promoting interdisciplinary communication while designing Xue Xue Institute, Taiwan’s first private university dedicated to the arts, design and culture. Although the original structure, a former office tower located in the middle of Taipei’s Nei-Hu district, was somewhat less than ideal, E15 transformed the drab facility into a series of refreshing rooms including a shop and media gallery, restaurant and kitchen areas, classrooms and office facilities. E15, a studio well known for furniture design, provided the university with a praiseworthy selection of furnishings that includes its own work as well as that of other European manufacturers. The well-crafted pieces have a double personality; they imbue the space not only with the mood of an educational facility but also with the sacred atmosphere of a chapel.

         



Please wait …